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Create vEdge Cloud VM Instance on AWS

To start a software vEdge Cloud router, you must create a virtual machine (VM) instance for it. This article describes how to create a VM instance on Amazon AWS. You can also create the VM on a server running the vSphere ESXi Hypervisor software or the Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) Hypervisor software.

To start the vEdge Cloud router virtual machine (VM) instance on Amazon AWS, first create a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC). The VPC is a self-contained environment in which you build the infrastructure you need in order to build your network.

Plan your network addressing carefully before creating the VPC. The VPC can use addresses only in the range you specify, and once you create a VPC, you cannot modify it. If your network addressing requirements change, you must delete the VPC and create a new one.

To start a vEdge Cloud router on Amazon AWS:

  1. Create a VPC.
  2. Set up the vEdge Cloud VM instance.
  3. Define additional interfaces.

Create a VPC

Plan your network address blocks carefully before creating the VPC. Once you create a VPC, you cannot modify it. To make any changes to the network addressing, you must delete the VPC and create a new one.

  1. Log in to AWS. In the Networking section of the AWS home page, click VPC.

  1. On the screen that opens, click Start VPC Wizard.
  2. On the Select a VPC Configuration screen, select VPC with Public and Private Subnets.

  1. On the VPC with Public and Private Subnets screen:
    1. In IP CIDR Block, enterthe desired IP addressing block. The VPC can use addresses only in this ange.
    2. Specify a public subnet and a private subnet from within the IP CIDR block.
    3. In Elastic IP Allocation ID, enter the address of your Internet gateway. This gateway translates internal traffic for delivery to the public Internet.
    4. Add endpoints for S3 only if you need extended storage space, such as for a large database.
    5. To use the AWS automatic registration of IP addresses to DNS, enable DNS hostnames.
    6. Select the desired Hardware tenancy, either shared or dedicated. You can share your AWS hardware with other AWS clients, or you can have dedicated hardware. With dedicated hardware, the device assigned to you can host only your data. However, the cost is higher.
    7. Click Create VPC.

Wait a few minutes until the VPC Dashboard displays the VPC Successfully Created message.

The infrastructure is now complete and ready for you to deploy applications, appliances, and the vEdge Cloud router. Click the links on the left to see the subnets, route tables, internet gateways, and NAT address translation points in the VPC.

Set Up the vEdge Cloud VM Instance

  1. Click Services ► EC2 to open the EC2 Dashboard, and then click Launch Instance.

  1. The Choose an Amazon Machine Image (AMI) screen opens. The Viptela AMI has a name in the format release-number-vEdge; for example, 16.1.0-vEdge. The Viptela AMI is private. Contact your Viptela sales representative, who can share the it with you.
  2. Choose the Viptela AMI, then click Select.

  1. The Choose an Instance Type screen appears. Determine which instance type best meets your needs, according to the following table. The minimum requirement is 2 vCPUs.

    Table 1: EC2 Instance Types that Support the vEdge Cloud Router

      vCPU Memory (GB) Instance Storage (GB)
    General Purpose — Current Generation

    m4.large

    2 8

    EBS only

    m4.xlarge 4 16 EBS only
    m4.2xlarge 8 32 EBS only
    m4.4xlarge 16 64 EBS only
    m4.10xlarge 40 160 EBS only
    Compute Optimized — Current Generation

    c4.large

    2 3.75 EBS only
    c4.xlarge 4 7.5 EBS only
    c4.2xlarge 8 15 EBS only
    c4.4xlarge 16 30 EBS only
    c4.8xlarge 36 60 EBS only
    c3.large 2 3.75 2 x 16 SSD
    c3.xlarge 4 7.5 2 x 40 SSD
    c3.2xlarge 8 15 2 x 80 SSD
    c3.4xlarge 16 30 2 x 160 SSD
    c3.8xlarge 32 60 2 x 320 SSD
  2. Select the preferred instance type, then click Next: Configure Instance Details.

  1. On the Configure Instance Details screen:
    1. In Network, select the VPC you just created.
    2. In Subnet, select the subnet for your first interface.
    3. In Network Interfaces, click Add Device and select a subnet for each additional interface.
    4. Click Next: Add Storage.

  1. The Add Storage screen opens. You do not need to change any settings on this screen. Click Next: Tag Instance.


 

  1. The Tag Instance screen opens. Enter your desired Key and Value, and then click Next: Configure Security Group.


 

  1. The Configure Security Group screen opens. Add rules to configure your firewall settings. These rules apply to outside traffic coming into your vEdge Cloud router.
    1. Below Type, select SSH.
    2. Below Source, select My IP.

  1. Click Add Rule, then fill out the fields as follows:
    1. Below Type, select Custom UDP Rule.
    2. Below Port Range, enter 12346.
    3. Below Source, select Anywhere. 12346 is the default port for IPSec.
    4. If port hopping is enabled, you may need to add more rules.

  1. Click Review and Launch. The Review Instance Launch screen opens. Click Launch.
  2. Select Proceed without a key pair, click the acknowledgement check box, then click Launch Instances.

Wait a few minutes, the instance initializes. The vEdge Cloud router is now running. The first interface, eth0, is always the management interface. The second interface, ge0/0, appears in VPN 0, but you can configure it to be in a different VPN.

Define Additional Interfaces

The vEdge Cloud router supports a total of nine interfaces. The first is always the management interface, and the remaining eight are transport and service interfaces. To configure additional interfaces:

  1. In the left pane, click Network Interfaces.
  2. Click Create Network Interface. Select the Subnet and Security group, and then click Yes, Create. Note that two interfaces in the same routing domain cannot be in the same subnet.
  3. Select the check box to the left of the new interface, and click Attach.
  4. Select the vEdge Cloud router, and click Attach.
  5. Reboot the vEdge Cloud router, because the vEdge detects interfaces only during the boot process.


The new interface is now up. The interface in VPN 0 connects to a WAN transport, such as the internet. The interface in VPN 1 faces a service-side network and can be used for appliances and applications. The interface in VPN 512 is dedicated to out-of-band management.

  1. To allow the interface to carry jumbo frames (packets with an MTU of 2000 bytes), configure the MTU from the CLI. For example:
vEdge# show interface
                                        IF      IF                                                                TCP                                   
                AF                      ADMIN   OPER    ENCAP                                      SPEED          MSS                 RX       TX       
VPN  INTERFACE  TYPE  IP ADDRESS        STATUS  STATUS  TYPE   PORT TYPE  MTU   HWADDR             MBPS   DUPLEX  ADJUST  UPTIME      PACKETS  PACKETS  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0    ge0/0      ipv4  10.66.15.15/24    Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:62  1000   full    1420    0:14:05:07  545682   545226   
0    ge0/1      ipv4  10.1.17.15/24     Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:6c  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:19  0        10       
0    ge0/2      ipv4  -                 Down    Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:76  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:47  0        0        
0    ge0/3      ipv4  10.0.20.15/24     Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:80  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:19  0        10       
0    ge0/6      ipv4  57.0.1.15/24      Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:9e  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:19  0        10       
0    ge0/7      ipv4  10.0.100.15/24    Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:a8  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:19  770      705      
0    system     ipv4  172.16.255.15/32  Up      Up      null   loopback   1500  00:00:00:00:00:00  0      full    1420    0:14:21:30  0        0        
0    loopback3  ipv4  10.1.15.15/24     Up      Up      null   transport  2000  00:00:00:00:00:00  10     full    1920    0:14:21:22  0        0        
1    ge0/4      ipv4  10.20.24.15/24    Up      Up      null   service    2000  00:0c:29:db:f0:8a  1000   full    1920    0:14:21:15  52014    52055    
1    ge0/5      ipv4  56.0.1.15/24      Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:94  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:15  0        8        
512  eth0       ipv4  10.0.1.15/24      Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:50:56:00:01:05  0      full    0       0:14:21:16  28826    29599    

vEdge# config 
Entering configuration mode terminal
vEdge(config)# vpn 0 interface ge0/3 mtu 2000
vEdge(config-interface-ge0/3)# commit 
Commit complete.
vEdge(config-interface-ge0/3)# end
vEdge# show interface
                                        IF      IF                                                                TCP                                   
                AF                      ADMIN   OPER    ENCAP                                      SPEED          MSS                 RX       TX       
VPN  INTERFACE  TYPE  IP ADDRESS        STATUS  STATUS  TYPE   PORT TYPE  MTU   HWADDR             MBPS   DUPLEX  ADJUST  UPTIME      PACKETS  PACKETS  
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
0    ge0/0      ipv4  10.66.15.15/24    Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:62  1000   full    1420    0:14:05:30  546018   545562   
0    ge0/1      ipv4  10.1.17.15/24     Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:6c  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:42  0        10       
0    ge0/2      ipv4  -                 Down    Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:76  1000   full    1420    0:14:22:10  0        0        
0    ge0/3      ipv4  10.0.20.15/24     Up      Up      null   service    2000  00:0c:29:db:f0:80  1000   full    1920    0:14:21:42  0        10       
0    ge0/6      ipv4  57.0.1.15/24      Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:9e  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:42  0        10       
0    ge0/7      ipv4  10.0.100.15/24    Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:a8  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:42  773      708      
0    system     ipv4  172.16.255.15/32  Up      Up      null   loopback   1500  00:00:00:00:00:00  0      full    1420    0:14:21:54  0        0        
0    loopback3  ipv4  10.1.15.15/24     Up      Up      null   transport  2000  00:00:00:00:00:00  10     full    1920    0:14:21:46  0        0        
1    ge0/4      ipv4  10.20.24.15/24    Up      Up      null   service    2000  00:0c:29:db:f0:8a  1000   full    1920    0:14:21:38  52038    52079    
1    ge0/5      ipv4  56.0.1.15/24      Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:0c:29:db:f0:94  1000   full    1420    0:14:21:38  0        8        
512  eth0       ipv4  10.0.1.15/24      Up      Up      null   service    1500  00:50:56:00:01:05  0      full    0       0:14:21:39  28926    29663    

The following instances support jumbo frames:

  • Accelerated computing—CG1, G2, P2
  • Compute optimized—C3, C4, CC2
  • General purpose—​​​​​​​M3, M4, T2
  • Memory optimized—​​​​​​​CR1, R3, R4, X1
  • Storage optimized—​​​​​​​D2, HI1, HS1, I2
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